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2015 Asian Pacific Islander Heritage Month

ManyCulturesOneVoice

Many Cultures, One Voice: Promote Equality and Inclusion

May is Asian Pacific American Heritage Month. Just as we celebrate the rich history and contributions of our Black, Latino, and American Indian brothers and sisters, so too should we recognize, appreciate, and celebrate the vibrant and diverse culture of Asian Americans.

 

Who are our Asian Pacific Siblings?

Asian Americans are Americans of Asian descent. The U.S. Census Bureau definition of Asians refers to a person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent. It includes people who indicated their race(s) as “Asian” or reported entries such as “Chinese”, “Filipino”, “Indian”, “Vietnamese”, “Korean”, “Japanese”, and “Other Asian” or provided other detailed Asian responses. They comprise 4.8% of the U.S. population alone, while people who are Asian combined with at least one other race make up 5.6%.LGBT

Asian Pacific Islander Icons

 


Padmini PrakashPadmini Prakash is India’s first transgender news anchor. Prakash, 32, is India’s first transgender news anchor(2014). She works at the Tamil language channel based in Coimbatore in the state of Tamil Nadu. Prakash worked for Lotus News, based in Coimbatore for about a month before she was promoted in August to anchor its 7 p.m. broadcast.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2014/09/22/padmini-prakash-is-indias-first-transgender-news-anchor/

 


Kim Coco IwamotoKim Coco Iwamoto

Kim Coco Iwamoto became the highest-ranked openly transgender official in the U.S. when she won a seat on Hawaii’s Board of Education in 2006. Iwamoto, of Japanese descent, has continuously advocated and worked with LGBT youth as a licensed therapeutic foster parent, lawyer and public figure.

http://kimcoco.com/about/


BD WongBD Wong

Chinese-American actor BD Wong is well-known for his roles both on the small and big screens (Law & Order: Special Victims UnitJurassic Park, etc.). He received the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation’s

Davidson / Valenti Award in 2003 and the Family Pride Coalition’s Family Tree Award in 2005. Both honors salute his LGBT advocacy.

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000703/bio

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B._D._Wong

 


Madhu KinnarMadhu Kinnar

Madhu Kinnar is India’s fifth transgender mayor.  Running as an independent candidate, Madhu won the mayor election of the Raigarh Municipal Corporation, securing 33,168 votes and defeating the nearest rival, BJP’s Mahaveer Guruji, by 4,537 votes .She belongs to Dalit community in India.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/01/05/india-transgender-mayor_n_6416906.html?

 

 


Helen ZiaHelen Zia

Award-winning author-journalist Helen Zia advocates for many causes, including gay rights, women’s rights and Asian-American visibility. Zia, who married her wife, Lia Shigemura, in 2008, wrote in the Amerasia Journal, “With each individual who comes to realize that there are Asian queers and queer Asians, that space where the gay zone meets the Asian zone opens up a little more.”

http://www.ed.gov/edblogs/aapi/helen_zia/

http://www.womensmediacenter.com/board/profile/helen-zia

 


Sutan AmrullSutan Amrull

Sutan Amrull, perhaps better known as Raja, won the third season of RuPaul’s Drag Race. The Indonesian-born drag performer, makeup artist and entertainer was also frequently seen on America’s Next Top Model.   In October Amrull participated in the L.A. launch of Born This Way: Real Stories of Growing Up Gay, sharing his life story with an audience at the L.A. Gay & Lesbian Center.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sutan_Amrull

https://www.facebook.com/RajaOfficial

 


Bindia RanaBindia Rana

Bindia Rana, she and a handful of others are the first of Pakistan’s transgender “hijra” community – which includes transsexuals, transvestites and others – to register as candidates in 2013. She was elected mayor.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/09/bindia-rana-pakistans-first-transgender-candidate_n_3243335.html?

http://blogs.tribune.com.pk/tag/bindiya-rana/

 


Jenny ShimizuJenny Shimizu

Jenny Shimizu   Openly lesbian model-actress Jenny Shimizu has graced the covers of Vogue (Australia and Singapore editions) and has also had roles both on the small and big screens. Shimizu, who is of Japanese descent, was named to A magazine’s “100 Most Influential Asian Americans of the Decade 1989-1999″ and received the Philadelphia International Gay and Lesbian Film Festival 2006 Lesbian Icon Award. The 48-year-old is also well-known for her relationship with Angelina Jolie.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jenny_Shimizu

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0793652/bio


Telly LeungTelly Leung 

Broadway star Telly Leung got on our mainstream radars when he played Wes, a Dalton Academy Warbler, on Glee. Leung, who’s Chinese-American and a native New Yorker, has had roles in WickedRent and Godspell and currently stars alongside George Takei in Allegiance.

http://www.tellyleung.com/

 

 


Sridhar RangayanSridhar Rangayan

Sridhar Rangayan, born 2 April 1962, is an Indian filmmaker who has made films with special focus on queer subjects. His queer films, The Pink Mirror and Yours Emotionally, have been considered groundbreaking because of their realistic and sympathetic portrayal of the largely closeted Indian gay community. His film The Pink Mirror remains banned in India by the Indian Censor Board because of its homosexual content. Rangayan was born in Mandya, Karnataka. As a gay activist, he has been one of the front-rank leaders in the LGBT movement in India and has contributed immensely towards the growth of awareness about sexual minorities in India.

http://archive.indianexpress.com/news/verdict-and-after/971411/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sridhar_Rangayan

 


BBai Lingai Ling

Chinese-born actress Bai Ling has made appearances on hit shows such as Lost and Entourage. She spoke about her bisexuality in a 2009 Examiner.com interview.

http://www.officialbailing.com/


Pamela Ki Mai ChenPamela Ki Mai Chen

In August 2012,  President Obama nominated openly lesbian Chinese-American Pamela Ki Mai Chen to serve on a New York district court. This marks the fifth nomination by the Obama administration of an openly LGBT person to the federal bench. This also makes Chen the second Chinese-American female judge in U.S. history.

http://www.lgbtqnation.com/tag/pamela-ki-mai-chen/

 


Beau SiaBeau Sia 

Beau Sia is a Chinese American boy, born in the year of the Dragon. He is the author of a Night Without Armor II: The Revenge (MouthAlmighty Books), he has a spoken word album called Attack! Attack! Go! (MouthAlmighty/Mercury Records), is featured in the films Slam and Slam Nation, has had his poetry appear during ESPN’s 2000 Winter X-Games, is a member of two national poetry slam championship teams, and he loves to play guitar.

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

Spoken Word by Beau Sia

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V63Z76eNzV0

Beau’s Website:                   Email:
www.beausia.com              beau@beausia.com

 


John and Helen Joo

John and Helen Joo

Our Families: LGBT Asian and Pacific Islander Stories

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OJMqIEBf2lY

Check out the first video from Our Families, in our series of videos that highlight the trials of triumphs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people of color. Our Families is a community education campaign that raises the visibility of LGBT people of color. In this video Asian and Pacific Islander families share with us their personal experiences. To learn more about Our Families, go to http://www.basicrights.org/ourfamilies/.

Ke Kulana He Mahu: Remembering a Sense of Place, this documentary relates a tale of how colonialism profoundly transformed Kanaka Maoli (indigenous Hawaiian) society and the forms of love that are acceptable in “the land of aloha.”

By contrasting the diversity of gender and sexual practices in precolonial times with the stigmatization and marginalization of transgendered and gay people in Hawai’i today, the film asks us to ponder a question posed by Kanaka Maoli activist Ku’umealoha Gomes at the beginning of the film: “Where did the change come from?” The question is a rhetorical one, and the film does not provide any explicit answers; rather, it forces us to draw our own conclusions by making sense of the montage of testimonies, interviews, dance performances, old photographs, artistic renderings, and scenes of ocean and landscapes presented to us. (On order for Diversity and Inclusion film series)

 

All pictures courtesy of API and BBC

Meditación Cuaresmal Pascua Domingo (5 de abril de 2015)

Meditación-Cuaresmal

Rev. Obispa Dra. Mona West
Pascua es un Verbo

Me ha llamado mucho la atención el número de sustantivos que se están convirtiendo en verbos en estos días, especialmente en el mundo de la tecnología: google, skype, marcadores, correo electrónico, texto, mensaje, amigo / no amigo. Verbificar o laverbificación (que también es un sustantivo que se convirtió  en un verbo) es un proceso natural de la lengua el cómo los sustantivos se incrustan más en nuestro vocabulario como algo que hacemos así como algo que son. Aunque ‘ marica’ no es un sustantivo (es un adjetivo) ICM ha afirmado esta palabra como un verbo en nuestros esfuerzos para resistir, subvertir y cuestionar (consultar) las estructuras y sistemas opresivos. ¡Hay algo que decir sobre este tipo de acción de convertir en verbos!

 

Mi querida amiga del seminario, Dawn Ripley, fue la primera persona que compartió conmigo que Pascua es un verbo. Ella citó este verso del poema de Gerard Manly Hopkins: Permitamos que la Pascua de Dios en nosotrossea el alba en nuestra penumbra, sea la Pascua escudo carmesí. En mi infancia como bautista del sur, el sustantivo Pascua significaba que iba al cielo. Tenía muy poco que ver con mi vida presente antes de llegar al cielo. Afirmando la Pascua como verbo ha producido “nueva vida” como parte de cada día en esta vida.

Por lo tanto, si afirmamos que Pascua es un verbo… ¿cómo lo conjugamos?

Yo Pascua                               Nosotros / Nosotras Pascuas

Tú Pascua                               Ustedes Pascuas

El / Ella / Ello Pascua              Ellos / Ellas Pascuas

Yo Pascua. Comencemos con la primera persona del singular. Como a María Magdalena en la tumba, Jesús nos llama a cada uno de nosotros por nuestro nombre. Y cuando escuchamos a Jesús pronunciando nuestro nombre, él Pascua en nosotros, él es el alba en nuestra penumbra. Pascua no es sólo una fiesta que celebramos, o una doctrina que creemos o debatimos. Pascua se presenta dentro de nuestra existencia. Jesús resucita en mí, en ti. Yo Pascua. Es lo que María hizo cuando ella les dijo a los discípulos que Jesús estaba vivo-ella estaba siendo Pascua. Yo Pascua cada vez que tomo decisiones a favor de la vida, en lugar de la muerte. Yo Pascua cada vez que anuncio, o señalo la vida ofreciendo lugares donde Dios trabaja en el mundo y en mi vida.

 

Tú Pascua. La segunda persona del singular. Si María hubiera sido la única persona en tener la experiencia de Pascua; si ella hubiera mantenido para sí misma o pensado que sólo tenía significado para ella y no para nadie más, la historia de la resurrección se hubiera quedado en un secreto. Tú Pascua. El mismo hacer Pascua está sucediendo en mí, está aconteciendo en ti. Estoy convencida que los conflictos que vivimos en nuestras iglesias sería resueltos si nosotros reconocemos la Pascua de Jesus en cada persona.

 

Él / Ella / Ello Pascua. Tercera persona del singular. En el Libro a los Romanos, el apóstol Pablo anuncia que toda la creación gime por redención. Los Salmos nos dicen que Dios ofrece salvación para humanos y bestias por igual. Creo que la Pascua de Jesús no está solamente en ti y en mí, sino en todo el orden de la creación. En la creación vemos la Pascua en todo lo que nos rodea y nos invita a este evento verbal de “la recreación del nuevo día de Dios”.

 

Nosotros / Nosotras Pascuas. Primera persona del plural. Nosotros(as), la Iglesia, somos una comunidad resucitada. Todas las personas estamos llamadas a Pascua cada día-a la práctica de la resurrección-como dijo poéticamente Wendell Berry, por nuestros actos de justicia y compasión.

 

Ustedes Pascuas. Segunda persona del plural. O como decimos en mi ciudad natal del sureste, Y’all Easter. Qué significa decir “Y’all Easter”. ¿Podría significar el afirmar la vida trabajando en otras comunidades de fe, otras tradiciones religiosas? ¿Podría significar el expresar que la Pascua es un verbo inter-religioso, inter-confesional? Yo pienso que sí.

 

Ellos / Ellas Pascuas. Tercera persona del plural. Decir ‘Ellos / Ellas Pascuas’ es reconocer el trabajo que las personas realizan en todo el mundo, a favor de la justicia y la vida enfrentando la Guerra, el genocidio, la corrupción, la homofobia y la codicia. Oscar Romero, el arzobispo de El Salvador trabajó por los pobres oprimidos en su país. En 1980 fue asesinado por ser Pascua, antes de morir él dijo, “Si ustedes me matan, resucitaré en los corazones de mi pueblo”. Ellos Pascua. Ellas Pascua.


Un escritor ha dicho que la resurrección “es la mayor acción verbal de Dios, el SÍ de Dios a la nueva vida… Los peores seres humanos no tienen la última palabra. La crueldad, el odio y la violencia no tienen la última palabra”. La Resurrección es la palabra final de Dios, una y otra vez. Nosotros conocemos está gran acción verbal en ICM. Es por lo que invitamos a las personas a Ser ICM, Ser Pascua.

  • Meditación Cuaresmal Pascua Domingo (5 de abril de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Easter Sunday (5 April 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Viernes Santo (3 de abril de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Good Friday (3 April 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Jueves Santo (2 de abril de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Maundy Thursday (2 April 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Domingo de Pasión (29 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Liturgy of the Passion (29 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Domingo de Ramos (29 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Palm Sunday (29 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Quinto Domingo (22 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for the fifth Sunday (22 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Cuarto Domingo (15 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for the fourth Sunday (15 March 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for the Third Sunday (8 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Tercer Domingo (8 de marzo de 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Segundo Domingo (1 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for the Second Sunday (1 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Primer Domingo (22 de febrero de 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for the First Sunday (22 February 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Miércoles de Ceniza (18 de febrero de 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for Ash Wednesday (18 February 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Easter Sunday (5 April 2015)

    Lenten Meditations

    by Rev. Elder Mona West, Ph.D.

    Easter is a Verb

    I have been struck by the number of nouns that are turning into verbs these days, especially from the world of technology: google, skype, bookmark, email, text, message, friend / unfriend. Verbing, or verbification (which is also a noun turned into a verb), is a natural process of language as nouns become more embedded in our vocabulary as something we do as well as something they are. Although ‘queer’ is not a noun (it is an adjective), MCC has claimed this word as a verb in our efforts to resist, subvert, and question (query) oppressive systems and structures. There is something to be said for this kind of verbing action!

     

    My dear friend from seminary, Dawn Ripley, was the first person to share with me that Easter is a verb. She quoted this line from a poem by Gerard Manly Hopkins: Let God Easter in us, be a dayspring to the dimness of us, be a crimson-crested East. In my Southern Baptist upbringing, the noun Easter meant I was going to heaven. It had little to do with my life in the meantime. Claiming Easter as a verb has made ‘new life’ a part of each day in this life.

    So, if we claim Easter as a verb, how do we conjugate it?
    I Easter                             We Easter
    You Easter                        You Easter
    He, She, Ze, It Easters     They Easter

    I Easter. We start with the first person singular. Like Mary Magdalene at the tomb, Jesus calls each of us by name. And when we hear Jesus call our name, he Easters in us; he is the dayspring to the dimness in us. Easter is not some holiday we celebrate or some doctrine we believe or debate. Easter gets inside us. Jesus is resurrected into me, into you. I Easter. That is what Mary did when she told the disciples Jesus was alive — she was Eastering. I Easter every time I make choices for life instead of death. I Easter every time I announce, or I point out the life-giving places where God is at work in the world and in my life.

    You Easter. Second person singular. If Mary had been the only one to experience Easter, if she had kept it to herself or thought it was only meant for her and no one else, the story of the resurrection would have been kept a secret. You Easter. The same Eastering that is happening in me is happening in you. I believe many of the conflicts that we experience in our churches would be resolved if we recognized Jesus’ Eastering in each other.

    He, She, Ze, It Easters. Third person singular. In the book of Romans, the apostle Paul claims that all of creation groans for redemption. The Psalms tell us that God provides salvation for human and beast alike. I believe Jesus Easters not only in you and me, but in all of the created order. In creation, we see Eastering all around us, and we are invited into this verbal event of “God’s re-creation of the new day.”

    We Easter. First person plural. We, the church, are a resurrection community. We are called to Easter every day — to practice resurrection — as poet Wendell Berry put it, by our acts of justice and compassion.

    You Easter. Second person plural. Or as we say in my hometown in the Southern U.S., Y’all Easter. What does it mean to say, “Y’all Easter”? Could it mean affirming the life-giving work of other faith communities, other religious traditions? Could it mean saying that Easter is an interfaith, interreligious verb? I believe so.

    They Easter. Third person plural. To say ‘They Easter’ is to acknowledge the work of people all over the world who Easter forth justice and life in the face of war, genocide, corruption, homophobia, and greed. Oscar Romero, the archbishop of El Salvador, worked for the oppressed poor in his country. In 1980, he was murdered for his Eastering, but before he died, he said, “If you kill me, I will rise again in the hearts of my people.” They Easter. They Easter.

    One writer has said that resurrection is “God’s great verbing action, God’s Yes to new life…. The worst humans can do is not the final word. Cruelty, hatred, and violence do not have the final word.” Resurrection is God’s final word, over and over and over again. We know about this great verbing action in MCC. That is why we invite people to ‘be MCC.’ This Easter Sunday, be MCC, be Easter.

  • Meditación Cuaresmal Pascua Domingo (5 de abril de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Easter Sunday (5 April 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Viernes Santo (3 de abril de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Good Friday (3 April 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Jueves Santo (2 de abril de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Maundy Thursday (2 April 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Domingo de Pasión (29 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Liturgy of the Passion (29 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Domingo de Ramos (29 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Palm Sunday (29 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Quinto Domingo (22 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for the fifth Sunday (22 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Cuarto Domingo (15 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for the fourth Sunday (15 March 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for the Third Sunday (8 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Tercer Domingo (8 de marzo de 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Segundo Domingo (1 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for the Second Sunday (1 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Primer Domingo (22 de febrero de 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for the First Sunday (22 February 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Miércoles de Ceniza (18 de febrero de 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for Ash Wednesday (18 February 2015)
  • Awareness, Affirmation & Action

    A Conversation and Call To Action

     

    MCC Public Policy Team members Rev. Dr. Robert Griffin (Sunshine Cathedral’s Executive Minister and member of MCC Governing Board) and Rev. DeWayne Davis(Senior Pastor of All God’s Children MCC) invite you to join them as they present a conference call series titled “Awareness, Affirmation & Action.”

     

    bejustice

    From the tragic killing of Trayvon Martin, to institutionalized racial targeting in Ferguson, MO, USA to a series of African-American youth being killed by authorities in various cities, to voting rights being threatened, to remembering the struggles of the Civil Rights era during the 50th anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery march, we continually are witnessing events that impact human dignity, security, and well-being.  These reminders let us know that our work for justice is not yet complete; there is much more to do.

     

    We invite you to join the call and listen to voices that will inspire and challenge us to keep our movement for justice alive and strong.

    • Thursday, April 2nd – 2:00 PM/ET – Bishop Dr. Yvette Flunder, Founder & Senior Pastor of City of Refuge United Church of Christ, Presiding Bishop of The Fellowship of Affirming Ministries
    • Thursday, April 9th – 2:00 PM/ET – Ruby Sales, Human Rights activist
    • Thursday, April 23rd – 2:00 PM/ET – Imam Daayiee Abdullah, an “out” gay Muslim cleric

    Call in information:

    Call Center:   1.626.677.3000

    ID:                 778024

     

    For more information please email Rev Dr Robert Griffin at Robert@SunshineCathedral.net

    Meditación Cuaresmal el Viernes Santo (3 de abril de 2015)

    Meditación-Cuaresmal

    Rev. Obispa Darlene Garner

    El Espíritu Santo también atestigua a nuestro favor…
    “Pondré mis leyes en sus corazones, y las escribiré en su mente…
    Nunca más me acordaré de sus pecados y sus acciones”.
    Dónde no hay perdón por esas cosas, ya no existirá un sacrificio por los pecados.
    Hebreos 10:15-18 (NRSV)

     

    El enfoque de esta reflexión del Viernes Santo es de la Carta a los Hebreos. Esta carta fue escrita a los cristianos primitivos cuya nueva fe les había sometido a persecución, encarcelamiento y pérdida de bienes. El escritor les alienta a continuar en la fe y en hacer buenas obras porque sus dificultades no habían sido en vano. El décimo capítulo en particular presenta la crucifixión como el plan eterno de Dios centrados en Cristo Jesús y alienta a la gente a ver ese día fatídico como la razón para que puedan participar de una nueva forma de vida, hecha posible a través del evento de la Cruz.

     

    Según la tradición judía, Dios inscribe el destino de cada persona para el año que viene en el libro de la vida en Rosh Hashaná y espera hasta Yom Kipur (el día de la expiación) para sellar el veredicto. Durante los Días del Temor (los diez días entre Rosh Hashaná y Yom Kipur), un judío intenta modificar su comportamiento y buscar el perdón por las injusticias cometidas contra Dios y contra otros seres humanos. Al final del Yom Kippur, es de esperar que ellos hayan sido perdonados por Dios.[i]

     

    En tiempos antiguos, el sumo sacerdote del templo tenía una función muy especial en Yom Kipur. Sólo en este día cada año, el sumo sacerdote iría detrás de la cortina del templo, entraría en el lugar Santísimo y rociaría la sangre del Cordero sacrificado en el Arca de la Alianza. Esta acción litúrgica tuvo el efecto de limpieza de la totalidad del pecado de Israel y renovar su relación de pacto con Dios. El escritor de Hebreos considera el sacrificio de Jesús como reemplazo de una vez por todas, de la necesidad de este rito anual de la expiación.

     

    Una interpretación cristiana común de la crucifixión es que Jesús es el cordero del sacrificio y el sumo sacerdote. Se ofreció hasta la muerte como el último sacrificio de expiación, de una vez y para siempre, por el pecado humano. Porque la cortina del templo fue rasgada cuando murió, no sólo el sumo sacerdote, sino todo el mundo entonces tenían acceso directo a Dios. Cuando murió Jesús, entonces tomaron su propia sangre en el santuario celestial y lo roció delante de Dios en el lugar Santísimo del Templo Celestial. A través de la muerte de Jesús y su sacrificio de sangre, ya no hay necesidad de más sacrificios porque Dios perdonó el pecado humano para siempre. Para quienes optan por responder a este acto de amor de Dios, ahora sólo hay amor eterno y perdón.

     

    Puesto que Dios ya nos ha perdonado, me pregunto qué pasaría si los cristianos eligieron el viernes santo como el único día del año cuando vivimos como gente perdonada. La gente perdonada no está motivada por el miedo. La gente perdonada no abriga resentimientos. La gente perdonada no abusa de otros. La gente perdonada no miente, engaña o robar. La gente perdonada perdona a las personas.

     

    Creo que ahora tales personas como Mahatma Gandhi, Nelson Mandela y Martin Luther King, Jr. Cada uno de ellos había sido perseguido y encarcelado por atreverse a proclamar a sus opresores que toda vida es importante. Aún a pesar de las horribles formas en que ellos habían sido tratados y las múltiples pérdidas que ellos habían soportado, no estaban amargados y buscaron venganza contra quienes les habían hecho tan mal. En cambio, perdonaron a sus opresores – continuando como la gente perdonada a conducir luchas no violentas por la justicia que cambió la historia de la humanidad.

     

    ¿Se imaginan el impacto que podría tener si la gente del mundo buscara y otorgara perdón el Viernes Santo? Si lo hicimos como personas que Dios ha perdonado ya, yo creo que los males que hacemos uno contra el otro se rectificaría. Cada actitud de opresión, fanatismo y prejuicio se transformaría en actos de compasión, misericordia y amor. Cesarían las guerras y el hambre podría ser alimentada cuando se conviertan las espadas en arados. La Madre tierra podría ser sanada, se fijaría bien las relaciones rotas y toda vida realmente importaría porque ese día la justicia fluiría como agua y la rectitud como una poderosa corriente.

     

    Aunque puedo estar equivocada, no puedo ayudar, pero creo que tal Revolución del Viernes Santo podría ser lo que más se necesita. En efecto, el perdón es lo que se necesitará para que nos transformemos mientras podamos transformar el mundo.

  • Meditación Cuaresmal Pascua Domingo (5 de abril de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Easter Sunday (5 April 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Viernes Santo (3 de abril de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Good Friday (3 April 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Jueves Santo (2 de abril de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Maundy Thursday (2 April 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Domingo de Pasión (29 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Liturgy of the Passion (29 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Domingo de Ramos (29 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Palm Sunday (29 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Quinto Domingo (22 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for the fifth Sunday (22 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Cuarto Domingo (15 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for the fourth Sunday (15 March 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for the Third Sunday (8 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Tercer Domingo (8 de marzo de 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Segundo Domingo (1 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for the Second Sunday (1 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Primer Domingo (22 de febrero de 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for the First Sunday (22 February 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Miércoles de Ceniza (18 de febrero de 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for Ash Wednesday (18 February 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Good Friday (3 April 2015)

    Lenten Meditations

    by Rev. Elder Darlene Garner

     

    The Holy Spirit also testifies to us…
    “I will put my laws in their hearts, and I will write them on their minds….
    I will remember their sins and their lawless deeds no more.”
    Where there is forgiveness of these, there is no longer any offering for sin.
    Hebrews 10:15-18 (NRSV)

    The focus of this Good Friday reflection is from the Letter to the Hebrews. This letter was written to early Christians whose new faith had subjected them to persecution, imprisonment, and loss of property. The writer is encouraging them to continue in faith and in doing good works because their hardships had not been in vain. The 10th Chapter in particular presents the Crucifixion as the eternal plan of God focused in Jesus Christ and encourages the people to see that fateful day as the reason for them to engage a new way of life made possible through the Cross event.

     

    According to Jewish tradition, God inscribes each person’s fate for the coming year into the Book of Life on Rosh Hashanah and waits until Yom Kippur (the Day of Atonement) to “seal” the verdict. During the Days of Awe (the ten High Holy Days between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur), a Jew tries to amend his or her behavior and seek forgiveness for wrongs done against God and against other human beings. At the end of Yom Kippur, one hopes they have been forgiven by God.[i]

     

    In ancient times, the high priest of the temple had a very special function on Yom Kippur.  Only on this one day each year, the high priest would go behind the temple curtain, enter the Holy of Holies, and sprinkle the blood of the sacrificial lamb on the Ark of the Covenant. This liturgical action had the effect of cleansing the whole of Israel from sin and renewing their covenant relationship with God. The writer of Hebrews regarded the self-sacrifice of Jesus as replacing, once and for all, the need for this annual ritual of atonement.

     

    A common Christian interpretation of the Crucifixion is that Jesus is both the Sacrificial Lamb and the High Priest. He offered himself unto death as the ultimate, once and forever, sacrificial atonement for human sin. Because the temple curtain was torn open as he died, not only the high priest, but also everyone else then had direct access to God. When he died, Jesus then took his own blood into the heavenly sanctuary and sprinkled it before God in the holiest place of the heavenly temple. Through Jesus’ death and blood sacrifice, there is no longer a need for further sacrifices because God forgave human sin forever. For those who choose to respond to this act of God’s love, there is now only eternal love and forgiveness.

     

    Since God has already forgiven us, I wonder what would happen if Christians chose Good Friday as the one day out of the year when we live as forgiven people. Forgiven people are not motivated by fear. Forgiven people do not harbor resentments. Forgiven people do not abuse others. Forgiven people do not lie, cheat, or steal. Forgiven people forgive people.

     

    I think now of such people as Mahatma Gandhi, Nelson Mandela, and Martin Luther King, Jr. Each of them had been persecuted and imprisoned for daring to proclaim to their oppressors that all lives matter. Yet, in spite of the horrible ways that they had been treated and the multiple losses that they had endured, they did not become embittered and seek revenge against those who had done them so wrong. Instead, they forgave their oppressors, continuing on as forgiven people to lead non-violent struggles for justice that changed human history.

     

    Can you imagine the impact it could have if people the world over would seek and grant forgiveness on Good Friday? If we did this as people who God has already forgiven, I believe that the wrongs we do against one another would be set right. Every attitude of oppression, bigotry, and bias would be transformed into acts of compassion, mercy, and love. Wars would cease, and the hungry would be fed, as swords are turned into plowshares. Mother Earth would be healed, broken relationships would be mended, and all lives really would matter because on that day justice would roll like water and righteousness like a mighty stream.

     

    Though I might be wrong, I cannot help but believe that such a Good Friday Revolution just might be the thing that is needed most. Indeed, forgiveness is what it will take for us to transform ourselves as we transform the world.

  • Meditación Cuaresmal Pascua Domingo (5 de abril de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Easter Sunday (5 April 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Viernes Santo (3 de abril de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Good Friday (3 April 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Jueves Santo (2 de abril de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Maundy Thursday (2 April 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Domingo de Pasión (29 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Liturgy of the Passion (29 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Domingo de Ramos (29 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Palm Sunday (29 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Quinto Domingo (22 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for the fifth Sunday (22 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Cuarto Domingo (15 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for the fourth Sunday (15 March 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for the Third Sunday (8 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Tercer Domingo (8 de marzo de 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Segundo Domingo (1 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for the Second Sunday (1 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Primer Domingo (22 de febrero de 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for the First Sunday (22 February 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Miércoles de Ceniza (18 de febrero de 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for Ash Wednesday (18 February 2015)
  • JOIN THE 33 CONGREGATIONS HOLDING AN EASTER OFFERING FOR GLOBAL JUSTICE!  

    27 March 2015

    Dear MCC Leader:

    We are writing to share that the response to this year’s Easter Offering for the Global Justice Institute has been strong! 32 congregations have signed up already!

    THANK YOU TO ALL THE CONGREGATIONS LISTED BELOW WHO HAVE ALREADY PLEDGED THEIR SUPPORT!

    If we haven’t yet heard from you, will your congregation join in collecting a special offering for Global Justice between Easter and Pentecost? Write to Global Justice Institute executive director Rev. Pat Bumgardner at revpat@globaljusticeinstitute.com and let us know that your church will collect a special, designated 2015 Easter offering.

    Click here to find out more about the projects this offerings support!

    You’ll be joining with the following 32 congregations that are leading the way for this year’s offering!

    All God’s Children MCC, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA
    Central Texas MCC, Waco, Texas, USA
    FirstCoast MCC, Saint Augustine, Florida, USA
    Founder’s MCC/ICM Fundadora Los Angeles, California, USA
    Holy Cross MCC, Pensacola, Florida, USA
    King of Peace MCC, Saint Petersburg, Florida, USA
    Love Alive International Sanctuary of Praise, New York, New York, USA
    MCC Austin,Texas, USA
    MCC Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA
    MCC Boston, Massachusetts, USA
    MCC Brisbane, Australia
    MCC DC, USA
    MCC Good Shepherd, Granville, Australia
    MCC Hartford, Connecticut, USA
    MCC Key West, Florida, USA
    MCC London, Ontario, Canada
    MCC Louisville, Kentucky, USA
    MCC New York, New York, USA
    MCC of Greater Saint Louis, Missouri, USA
    MCC of Paducah, Kentucky, USA
    MCC of the Blue Ridge, Roanoke, Virginia, USA
    MCC of the Spirit, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA
    MCC of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA
    MCC Portland, Oregon, USA
    MCC Sacred Journey, Hendersonville, North Carolina, USA
    MCC Sydney, Sydney, Australia
    Neema MCC, Nairobi, Kenya
    Northern Lights MCC, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK
    Open Circle MCC, Oxford, Florida, USA
    Open Door MCC, Boyds, Maryland, USA
    Peninsula MCC, San Mateo, California, USA
    SunCoast Cathedral MCC, Venice, Florida, USA
    The Village MCC, Brighton, UK
    And an individual pledge from Barb Crabtree, MCC Director of Operations

     

    Join us in bringing a message of hope to our global siblings!

     

    Grace and peace,

    Rev. Nancy Wilson Signature

    Rev. Dr. Nancy Wilson

    Moderator

    Metropolitan Community Churches

    Meditación Cuaresmal el Jueves Santo (2 de abril de 2015)

    Meditación-Cuaresmal

    Rev. Obispa Dra. Nancy Wilson

    1 Corintios 11: 23-26

     

    Transmitiendo lo que hemos recibido

     

    Recientemente, he recibido en el correo postal una valiosa colección de algunos diarios de principios a mediados de las décadas de los 30s y 40, de mi abuela. Describe con muchos detalles la vida durante la Depresión en la ciudad rural y pequeña de New England.  El cómo ellos vivieron, se apoyaron unos a otros, a la gran familia y a los vecinos. Qué hacían para divertirse, que tipo de alimentos comieron. Cuán tan duro trabajaron y caminaron por las veredas de la nieve en el invierno brutal. Recogieron 10 cuartos de arándanos e hicieron pies para vender o regular. Sobreviviendo a las dificultades y la pérdida.

     

    Me hizo pensar en todo lo que hemos recibido de ellos.

     

    No está en los diarios, pero mi abuela me dijo que en los días más oscuros de la Depresión, muchos estaban desanimados, buscando trabajo, tratando de sobrevivir. Dijo que, aunque era Bautista, la unidad le salvó la vida. Dijo, sin más explicación, que sus grupos de apoyo, haciendo hincapié en los principios del pensamiento positivo, salvaron su vida y su matrimonio. La unidad se convirtió en un suplemento a su fe Bautista, una fuente de fortaleza y esperanza para toda la vida.

     

    Paul comparte, en este pasaje, lo que recibió de parte del Señor, directamente, pero también lo que había sido pasado a él de esa primera generación de testigos de la última cena, la muerte y resurrección de Jesús.

     

    Recuerdo mis primeras comuniones en ICM, en las cuales me dijeron que el pasaje de Mateo fue recitado a menudo durante la liturgia de comunión: “Venid a mí todos ustedes que están cansados y agobiados y yo os haré descansar. Llevad mi yugo sobre vosotros y aprended de mí, que soy manso y humilde de corazón, y hallaréis descanso para vuestras almas. Porque mi yugo es suave y mi carga es liviana”. En esos primeros días, como en muchos lugares, las personas llegaron a las puertas de ICM agotadas por la opresión política, psicológica y espiritual que experimentaron. Escuchar de descanso y benignidad, de humildad y flexibilización de las cargas era y es salvar vidas.

     

    Durante la mayor parte de mi vida en el ministerio, he consagrado y servido la comunión cada domingo. Estos días, mientras que celebró y sirvo comunión ocasionalmente, estoy a menudo sentada en la banca, de las primeras filas en mi iglesia. Siempre estoy mirando el flujo de las personas caminando para recibir la comunión, quebrantadas y siendo curadas, alegres, sosteniéndose unos a otras, renovadas, bendecidas.  Ser parte de eso, todos los domingos, es sacramental para mí.

     

    Como creyentes, recibimos más de lo que realmente hacemos. Recibimos la gracia que es milagrosa y no negada.

     

    Estas palabras de Paul, de Jesús, son preciosas, palabras antiguas. Semana por semana, en el misterio que es la Eucaristía, que todavía recibimos directamente de parte Jesús, el Dios de nuestros antepasados y del momento presente. Lo que nosotros recibimos y compartimos, fielmente a la próxima generación.

     

    “Maravillosas palabras,” esa elevación de cargas y nos da poder para ser ICM, para ser el pueblo de Dios en un mundo cansado, anhelante de justicia y esperanza.

  • Meditación Cuaresmal Pascua Domingo (5 de abril de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Easter Sunday (5 April 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Viernes Santo (3 de abril de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Good Friday (3 April 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Jueves Santo (2 de abril de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Maundy Thursday (2 April 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Domingo de Pasión (29 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Liturgy of the Passion (29 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Domingo de Ramos (29 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Palm Sunday (29 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Quinto Domingo (22 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for the fifth Sunday (22 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Cuarto Domingo (15 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for the fourth Sunday (15 March 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for the Third Sunday (8 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Tercer Domingo (8 de marzo de 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Segundo Domingo (1 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for the Second Sunday (1 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Primer Domingo (22 de febrero de 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for the First Sunday (22 February 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Miércoles de Ceniza (18 de febrero de 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for Ash Wednesday (18 February 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Maundy Thursday (2 April 2015)

    Lenten Meditations

    by Rev. Elder Dr. Nancy Wilson

     

    1 Corinthians 11:23-26

     

    Handing On What We Have Received

    Recently, I received in the mail a treasure trove of some of my grandmother’s diaries from the early to mid-1930’s and 1940’s. It describes in great detail life during the Depression in rural and small town New England (USA). How they eeked out a living, took care of each other, extended family, and neighbors. What they did for fun, what food they ate. How hard they worked, and trekked through the snow drifts of brutal winters. Picking 10 quarts of blueberries and making pies to sell or give away. Surviving hardship and loss.

     

    It made me think of all we have received from them.

     

    It is not in the diaries, but my grandmother told me that in the darkest days of the Depression, so many were despondent, looking for work, trying to survive. She said that though she was a Baptist, Unity saved her life. She told me, without more explanation, that their support groups, emphasizing principles of positive thinking, saved her marriage and her life. Unity became a lifelong supplement to her Baptist faith, a source of strength and hope.

     

    Paul shares, in this passage, what he received from the Lord, directly, but also what had been passed on to him from that first generation of eyewitnesses to the Last Supper and the death and resurrection of Jesus.

     

    I remember my earliest communions in MCC, in which I was told that the passage from Matthew was often recited during the communion liturgy: “Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.” In those earliest days, as in many places now, people arrived on the doorstep of MCC exhausted from the spiritual, psychological, and political oppression they experienced. To hear of rest and gentleness, of humility and easing of burdens, was — and is — life-saving.

     

    For most of my life in ministry, I consecrated and served communion every Sunday. These days, while I celebrate and serve occasionally, I am often in the pew, near the front, at my home church. I am always transfixed watching people stream forward for communion, broken open and being healed, joyful, holding on to each other, refreshed, blessed. Just being part of that, every Sunday, is sacramental for me.

     

    As believers, we receive before we do anything else. We receive grace that is unearned and miraculous.

     

    These words of Paul, of Jesus, are precious, ancient words. Week by week, in the mystery that is the Eucharist, we still receive them directly from Jesus, from the God of our ancestors, and of this present moment. We receive them and hand them on, faithfully to the next generation.

     

    “Wonderful words” that lift burdens and empower us to BE MCC, to be the people of God in a weary world, a world longing for justice and hope.

  • Meditación Cuaresmal Pascua Domingo (5 de abril de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Easter Sunday (5 April 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Viernes Santo (3 de abril de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Good Friday (3 April 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Jueves Santo (2 de abril de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Maundy Thursday (2 April 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Domingo de Pasión (29 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Liturgy of the Passion (29 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal el Domingo de Ramos (29 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for Palm Sunday (29 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Quinto Domingo (22 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for the fifth Sunday (22 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Cuarto Domingo (15 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten meditation for the fourth Sunday (15 March 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for the Third Sunday (8 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Tercer Domingo (8 de marzo de 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Segundo Domingo (1 de marzo de 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for the Second Sunday (1 March 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Primer Domingo (22 de febrero de 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for the First Sunday (22 February 2015)
  • Meditación Cuaresmal Miércoles de Ceniza (18 de febrero de 2015)
  • Lenten Meditation for Ash Wednesday (18 February 2015)
  • Help promote LGBT rights in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, India, Vietnam, and Malaysia

    Hello friends,

    This summer Rev. Dr. Boon Lin Ngeo will be traveling to Asia on behalf of the Global Justice Institute. Rev. Boon has worked extensively abroad for the Institute and this year will visit China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, India, Vietnam, and Malaysia. In addition to making connections with LGBTQI centers and organizations, he will also being giving at least 20 talks in 15 cities on religion and sexuality, social justice, and human rights. Rev. Boon will be attending the gay pride parade in Vietnam as well. We would love support from communities around the world in order to make this trip and future work possible.
    Please see the following link to learn more about his work and how you can contribute: http://igg.me/at/lgbtasia
    Rev. Dr. Boon